I’m sitting here listening to Vince Garcia on Super70s.  Jesus, these guys are so drunk.  I wish I was recording this so that, if he says something hilarious, (as he probably will, given his propensity to be the most entertaining when he’s trying the least), and then play it back later.  Either way though, I hope he has a happy new year all the same. 

Originally published at Customerservant.com. You can comment here or there.

The following is a mailing I received as part of the Hazon list, and I thought I’d post it.  The goal of Hazon is to promote understanding between Jews and Gentiles, and to illustrate the Torah’s universality and aplicability to both Jews and Gentiles. 

The Journey to Unity – 162

Introduction: The term “Chanukah” refers to “dedication” (Psalm 30:1). The Festival of Chanukah not only commemorates the miracle of the light; it also
commemorates the re-dedication of the Holy Temple by the Maccabees, the family of “Kohanim” – ministers – that led the rebellion against the oppressors
who defiled the Temple.  This re-dedication of the Temple is mentioned in a special prayer which we chant on Chanukah:

“Thereafter, Your children came to the Holy of Holies of Your House, cleansed Your Temple, purified the site of Your holiness and kindled lights in the
Courtyards of Your Sanctuary; and they established these eight days of Chanukah to express thanks and praise to Your great Name” (Al Hanisim).

In the next few letters of our series, we will discuss the universal role of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and the deeper significance of the offerings which
were brought to the Temple. These letters are dedicated to the memory of my father and teacher, Shlomo Ben Avraham Hakohen. His yahrtzeit – the anniversary
of his passing – is on the 2nd of Teves, which in most years falls on the 8th day of Chanukah.

The Universal Role of the Temple:

Dear Friends,

According to Jewish tradition, “Adam” – the first human being – was created as an androgynous being that was later divided into two separate beings – one
male and one female (Genesis Rabbah 8:1). Where was this androgynous being created? An answer can be found in the Midrash which states that the first human
being was created at the site of the future Temple in Jerusalem:

“With an abounding love did the Holy One, blessed be He, love the first human being, as He created him in a pure locality, in the place of the Temple.”
(Pirkei D’Rabbi Eliezer, chapter 12)

According to Maimonides, it is the accepted tradition that the site of the Altar in the Holy Temple is the place where “Adam” – the ancestor of all humanity
– was created (Beis Habechirah 2:2). All human beings therefore have roots in this sacred site; thus, it is not surprising that Jewish tradition encourages
all peoples to make a pilgrimage to the Temple. The following can serve as examples:

According to an ancient biblical commentary cited in the Talmud, Moses taught our people that free-will elevation offerings can be brought to the Sanctuary
by both Israelites and non-Israelites (Chullin 13b). Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch explains that this teaching of Moses established the universal role of
the Sanctuary (commentary to Leviticus 1:2).  In this spirit, when King Solomon dedicated the Holy Temple in Jerusalem which he built, he prayed to the
Compassionate One:

“Moreover, concerning a foreigner who is not of your people, Israel, but will come from a distant land, for Your Name’s sake – for they will hear of Your
great Name and Your strong hand and Your outstretched arm, and will come and pray toward this Temple – may you hear from Heaven, the foundation of Your
abode, and fulfill all that the foreigner asks of You; so that all the peoples of the earth may know Your Name, to revere You as does Your people Israel,
and to know that Your Name is proclaimed upon this Temple that I have built.” ( I Kings 8:41-43)

In a later generation, the Prophet Isaiah conveyed the following Divine promise concerning the universal role of the rebuilt Temple in the messianic age:
“For My House will be called a house of prayer for all the peoples” (Isaiah 56:7) According to the classical biblical commentators, Radak and Ibn Ezra,
this prophecy is in the spirit of the prayer that King Solomon offered when he dedicated the Temple.

A poetic allusion to the above Divine promise appears in “Maoz Tzur” – a song which is sung after the lighting of the Chanukah Menorah:

“Restore ‘My House of Prayer’ and there we will bring a thanksgiving offering.”

One of the most moving descriptions of the universal pilgrimage to the Temple is found in the following prophecy:

“It will happen in the end of days: The mountain of the Compassionate One’s Temple will be firmly established as the head of the mountains, and it will
be exalted above the hills, and all the nations will stream to it. Many peoples will go and say, ‘Come, let us go up to the Mountain of the Compassionate
One, to the Temple of the God of Jacob, and He will teach us of His ways and we will walk in His paths.’ For from Zion will go forth Torah, and the word
of the Compassionate One from Jerusalem.” (Isaiah 2:2,3)

The Prophet adds that the spiritual enlightenment which will emerge from this universal pilgrimage will lead to universal justice and peace: “He (the Messiah)
will judge among the nations, and will settle the disputes of many peoples; they shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning
hooks; nation will not lift sword against nation, and they will no longer study warfare” (2:4).

The Book of Micah includes the above prophecy about the universal pilgrimage to the Temple (4:1-3); however, the prophecy in Micah has the following addition:

“They will sit, each person under his vine and under his fig tree, and none will make them afraid, for the mouth of the Compassionate One, God of the hosts
of Creation, has spoken” (4:4).

The classical biblical commentators, Radak and Ibn Ezra, explain that the peaceful and pastoral vision of “each person under his vine and under his fig
tree” includes all humankind. After the universal pilgrimage to the Temple, the new spiritual enlightenment will cause the earth to become a peaceful garden
 – a reminder of the Garden of Eden.

A Good Month and a Happy Chanukah!
Yosef Ben Shlomo Hakohen   (See below)

A Related Teaching:

How will the pilgrims from all the peoples be greeted when they arrive at the Holy Temple in Jerusalem? It is written, “Blessed is the one who comes in
the Name of the Compassionate One; we will bless you from the House of the Compassionate One” (Psalm 118:26). According to the classical biblical commentator,
Radak, the above blessing will be said by the Kohanim to the pilgrims from all the peoples who will arrive at the dawn of the messianic age, and through
this blessing, the pilgrims are being invited to join Israel in the service of the Compassionate One.

www.shemayisrael.co.il/publicat/hazon/“>Hazon – Our Universal Vision

Originally published at Customerservant.com. You can comment here or there.

The following is a mailing I received as part of the Hazon list, and I thought I’d post it.  The goal of Hazon is to promote understanding between Jews and Gentiles, and to illustrate the Torah’s universality and aplicability to both Jews and Gentiles. 

The Journey to Unity – 162

Introduction: The term “Chanukah” refers to “dedication” (Psalm 30:1). The Festival of Chanukah not only commemorates the miracle of the light; it also
commemorates the re-dedication of the Holy Temple by the Maccabees, the family of “Kohanim” – ministers – that led the rebellion against the oppressors
who defiled the Temple.  This re-dedication of the Temple is mentioned in a special prayer which we chant on Chanukah:

“Thereafter, Your children came to the Holy of Holies of Your House, cleansed Your Temple, purified the site of Your holiness and kindled lights in the
Courtyards of Your Sanctuary; and they established these eight days of Chanukah to express thanks and praise to Your great Name” (Al Hanisim).

In the next few letters of our series, we will discuss the universal role of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and the deeper significance of the offerings which
were brought to the Temple. These letters are dedicated to the memory of my father and teacher, Shlomo Ben Avraham Hakohen. His yahrtzeit – the anniversary
of his passing – is on the 2nd of Teves, which in most years falls on the 8th day of Chanukah.

The Universal Role of the Temple:

Dear Friends,

According to Jewish tradition, “Adam” – the first human being – was created as an androgynous being that was later divided into two separate beings – one
male and one female (Genesis Rabbah 8:1). Where was this androgynous being created? An answer can be found in the Midrash which states that the first human
being was created at the site of the future Temple in Jerusalem:

“With an abounding love did the Holy One, blessed be He, love the first human being, as He created him in a pure locality, in the place of the Temple.”
(Pirkei D’Rabbi Eliezer, chapter 12)

According to Maimonides, it is the accepted tradition that the site of the Altar in the Holy Temple is the place where “Adam” – the ancestor of all humanity
– was created (Beis Habechirah 2:2). All human beings therefore have roots in this sacred site; thus, it is not surprising that Jewish tradition encourages
all peoples to make a pilgrimage to the Temple. The following can serve as examples:

According to an ancient biblical commentary cited in the Talmud, Moses taught our people that free-will elevation offerings can be brought to the Sanctuary
by both Israelites and non-Israelites (Chullin 13b). Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch explains that this teaching of Moses established the universal role of
the Sanctuary (commentary to Leviticus 1:2).  In this spirit, when King Solomon dedicated the Holy Temple in Jerusalem which he built, he prayed to the
Compassionate One:

“Moreover, concerning a foreigner who is not of your people, Israel, but will come from a distant land, for Your Name’s sake – for they will hear of Your
great Name and Your strong hand and Your outstretched arm, and will come and pray toward this Temple – may you hear from Heaven, the foundation of Your
abode, and fulfill all that the foreigner asks of You; so that all the peoples of the earth may know Your Name, to revere You as does Your people Israel,
and to know that Your Name is proclaimed upon this Temple that I have built.” ( I Kings 8:41-43)

In a later generation, the Prophet Isaiah conveyed the following Divine promise concerning the universal role of the rebuilt Temple in the messianic age:
“For My House will be called a house of prayer for all the peoples” (Isaiah 56:7) According to the classical biblical commentators, Radak and Ibn Ezra,
this prophecy is in the spirit of the prayer that King Solomon offered when he dedicated the Temple.

A poetic allusion to the above Divine promise appears in “Maoz Tzur” – a song which is sung after the lighting of the Chanukah Menorah:

“Restore ‘My House of Prayer’ and there we will bring a thanksgiving offering.”

One of the most moving descriptions of the universal pilgrimage to the Temple is found in the following prophecy:

“It will happen in the end of days: The mountain of the Compassionate One’s Temple will be firmly established as the head of the mountains, and it will
be exalted above the hills, and all the nations will stream to it. Many peoples will go and say, ‘Come, let us go up to the Mountain of the Compassionate
One, to the Temple of the God of Jacob, and He will teach us of His ways and we will walk in His paths.’ For from Zion will go forth Torah, and the word
of the Compassionate One from Jerusalem.” (Isaiah 2:2,3)

The Prophet adds that the spiritual enlightenment which will emerge from this universal pilgrimage will lead to universal justice and peace: “He (the Messiah)
will judge among the nations, and will settle the disputes of many peoples; they shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning
hooks; nation will not lift sword against nation, and they will no longer study warfare” (2:4).

The Book of Micah includes the above prophecy about the universal pilgrimage to the Temple (4:1-3); however, the prophecy in Micah has the following addition:

“They will sit, each person under his vine and under his fig tree, and none will make them afraid, for the mouth of the Compassionate One, God of the hosts
of Creation, has spoken” (4:4).

The classical biblical commentators, Radak and Ibn Ezra, explain that the peaceful and pastoral vision of “each person under his vine and under his fig
tree” includes all humankind. After the universal pilgrimage to the Temple, the new spiritual enlightenment will cause the earth to become a peaceful garden
 – a reminder of the Garden of Eden.

A Good Month and a Happy Chanukah!
Yosef Ben Shlomo Hakohen   (See below)

A Related Teaching:

How will the pilgrims from all the peoples be greeted when they arrive at the Holy Temple in Jerusalem? It is written, “Blessed is the one who comes in
the Name of the Compassionate One; we will bless you from the House of the Compassionate One” (Psalm 118:26). According to the classical biblical commentator,
Radak, the above blessing will be said by the Kohanim to the pilgrims from all the peoples who will arrive at the dawn of the messianic age, and through
this blessing, the pilgrims are being invited to join Israel in the service of the Compassionate One.

www.shemayisrael.co.il/publicat/hazon/“>Hazon – Our Universal Vision

This is the second letter from the Hazon series on the Temple and its universal applicability.
The Journey to Unity – 163

Temple Offerings: The View of Maimonides

“It is fitting for a human being to meditate on the laws of the Holy Torah, to know their ultimate meaning and purpose, to the extent of his ability. Yet
if there is something for which he finds no reason, and knows no purpose, let it not be a light, trifling matter in his eyes, and let him not break through
to rise up against the Compassionate One…Let his thinking about this not be like his thought about ordinary, non-holy matters.” (Mishneh Torah of Maimonides
– Hilchos M”ilah 8:8)

Dear Friends,

Maimonides – also known as “the Rambam” – wrote a special book called “Guide to the Perplexed” in order to guide certain young Jewish intellectuals of the
12th century who were influenced by Greek philosophy, and who were questioning the value of the mitzvos – Divine mandates. In this book, he suggests that
a reason for the offerings was to wean the People of Israel away from the pagan worship of animals. Maimonides explains that the ancient Egyptians and
others viewed the animals of the herd as deities; thus, the People of Israel were commanded to take the very animals that these people worshiped and to
offer them to the Revered Name. (Guide to the Perplexed 3:46, cited in the commentary of the Ramban – Nachmanides – on Leviticus 1:9)

There were other sages who disagreed with the reason suggested by Maimonides; moreover, other writings of Maimonides indicate that he did not consider this
reason to be the only reason. For example, in his classical work on Torah law, the Mishneh Torah, he writes that the Temple offerings are in the category
of those mitzvos of the Infinite One which are known as “chukim” – mitzvos which have deep reasons which our finite minds do not yet understand (Hilchos
Me’ilah 8:8). And Maimonides adds: “The Sages said that for the sake of the Temple service of the offerings, the world endures.”

In the Mishneh Torah (Hilchos Beis HaBechinrah 2:2), Maimonides cites the ancient tradition that Adam, as well as Cain and Abel, brought offerings on the
site of the future Holy Temple. Although they had a vegetarian diet, Adam and Abel brought animal offerings, and according to the Talmud, the animal that
Adam offered on the Altar was an ox (Avodah Zarah 8:a). The Torah states that Abel “brought from the firstlings of his flock and from the choicest” (Genesis
4:4). These individuals lived in the age before the pagan worship of animals emerged; thus, one cannot say that the reason for their offerings was to wean
themselves from the pagan worship of animals!

Maimonides also writes in the Mishneh Torah that in the messianic age, the Temple will be rebuilt and we will once again bring the offerings “according
to all the particulars mentioned in the Torah” (Hilchos Melachim 11:1). During the messianic age, all forms of idolatry will be abolished, for all peoples
will unite to serve the One Creator; thus, the reason for the Temple offerings in this age cannot be because of a need to wean people from pagan practices,
“for the earth will be filled with knowledge of the Compassionate One” (Isaiah 11:9).

We therefore need to seek a deeper meaning for the Temple offerings, and in this letter, we shall mention two “clues” which can guide us on our quest: The
first clue can be found in the Hebrew word for offerings, “korban” – a word which is derived from “karov” (closeness). As the classical biblical commentator,
the Ramban (Nachmanides), writes:

“All terms of korban are expressions of closeness and unity.” (Commentary to Leviticus 1:9).

In this spirit, Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch writes:

“We have no word in Western languages that adequately conveys the concept in the Hebrew term korban. The common German translation opher, deriving from
the Latin offero, is related to “offering” in meaning; but unfortunately, in the sense of ’sacrifice,’ it has taken on the connotation of destruction,
annihilation, and loss – a connotation that is foreign and antithetical to the Hebrew concept of korban…The purpose of a korban is to seek the Divine nearness.”
(Commentary to Leviticus 1:2)

The second clue can be found in the Hebrew term for God which is used when the Torah introduces the laws of the korban. The term used is “Hashem” – the
most sacred Divine Name which expresses the attribute of compassion. As Rabbi Yossi states in Midrash Toras Kohanim (Leviticus 1:2): “Wherever the offerings
are mentioned, the Divine Name of Hashem is used, so as not to give heretics the opportunity to degrade the truths of the Torah to the level of pagan delusion.”
In his explanation of Rabbi Yossi’s teaching, Rabbi Hirsch points out that within the Torah, the Divine Name “Elokim” – the Name expressing the attribute
of strict justice – is not used in association with the korban. Rabbi Hirsch writes:

“In such a context, God does not refer to Himself by the attribute of strict, unrelenting justice…God does not demand to be appeased through an offering,
in accord with the blasphemous pagan delusion. He does not seek vengeance and thirst for blood and accept the dying animal as a substitute for the human
being who deserves to die. Rather, the Name Hashem is associated with offerings; God refers to himself by the attribute of compassion. He appears in the
full force of His liberating love, which brings into being all life, sustains its existence anew, and grants it a renewed future. The essence of an offering
is not killing, but rebirth and renewal of existence. Spiritual and moral awakening and revival; entering into a life more noble and pure; renewing strength
for such a life from the never-failing source of God’s love – that is the Jewish concept of an offering.” (Ibid)

With the help of Hashem, in our upcoming letters, we will begin to explore deep and mystical Torah teachings which can help us to understand how the korban
leads to a greater closeness with Hashem, and how it leads to our rebirth and renewal.

Shalom,
Yosef Ben Shlomo Hakohen (See below)

Related Teachings:

1. The classical biblical commentators give different reasons for the Temple offerings, based on sources within the Written and the Oral Torah. These various
explanations can be understood as different facets of the same truth. As our sages teach: “The Torah has seventy faces” (Zohar, Vol. 1, 47b).
2. The classical biblical commentator, Radak, suggests that Adam and Abel did not actually slaughter the animals that they offered on the Altar, for at
this early stage of human history, human beings did not have permission to kill animals, since their diet was vegetarian. They therefore placed the animals
on the Altar, and a Heavenly fire consumed them. (Commentary to Genesis 4:4)

3. As we shall discuss, the Prophets of Israel state that all the offerings – including the animal offerings – will be renewed when the Temple is rebuilt
in the messianic age. In this spirit, Maimonides wrote that in the messianic age we will once again bring the offerings “according to all the particulars
mentioned in the Torah” (Hilchos Melachim 11:1). Will we ever reach a stage in human history when all the offerings will be vegetarian? Following our future
discussion on the deeper meaning of the korban, we will explore various answers to this question.

Hazon – Our Universal Vision

Originally published at Customerservant.com. You can comment here or there.

This is the second letter from the Hazon series on the Temple and its universal applicability.
The Journey to Unity – 163

Temple Offerings: The View of Maimonides

“It is fitting for a human being to meditate on the laws of the Holy Torah, to know their ultimate meaning and purpose, to the extent of his ability. Yet
if there is something for which he finds no reason, and knows no purpose, let it not be a light, trifling matter in his eyes, and let him not break through
to rise up against the Compassionate One…Let his thinking about this not be like his thought about ordinary, non-holy matters.” (Mishneh Torah of Maimonides
– Hilchos M”ilah 8:8)

Dear Friends,

Maimonides – also known as “the Rambam” – wrote a special book called “Guide to the Perplexed” in order to guide certain young Jewish intellectuals of the
12th century who were influenced by Greek philosophy, and who were questioning the value of the mitzvos – Divine mandates. In this book, he suggests that
a reason for the offerings was to wean the People of Israel away from the pagan worship of animals. Maimonides explains that the ancient Egyptians and
others viewed the animals of the herd as deities; thus, the People of Israel were commanded to take the very animals that these people worshiped and to
offer them to the Revered Name. (Guide to the Perplexed 3:46, cited in the commentary of the Ramban – Nachmanides – on Leviticus 1:9)

There were other sages who disagreed with the reason suggested by Maimonides; moreover, other writings of Maimonides indicate that he did not consider this
reason to be the only reason. For example, in his classical work on Torah law, the Mishneh Torah, he writes that the Temple offerings are in the category
of those mitzvos of the Infinite One which are known as “chukim” – mitzvos which have deep reasons which our finite minds do not yet understand (Hilchos
Me’ilah 8:8). And Maimonides adds: “The Sages said that for the sake of the Temple service of the offerings, the world endures.”

In the Mishneh Torah (Hilchos Beis HaBechinrah 2:2), Maimonides cites the ancient tradition that Adam, as well as Cain and Abel, brought offerings on the
site of the future Holy Temple. Although they had a vegetarian diet, Adam and Abel brought animal offerings, and according to the Talmud, the animal that
Adam offered on the Altar was an ox (Avodah Zarah 8:a). The Torah states that Abel “brought from the firstlings of his flock and from the choicest” (Genesis
4:4). These individuals lived in the age before the pagan worship of animals emerged; thus, one cannot say that the reason for their offerings was to wean
themselves from the pagan worship of animals!

Maimonides also writes in the Mishneh Torah that in the messianic age, the Temple will be rebuilt and we will once again bring the offerings “according
to all the particulars mentioned in the Torah” (Hilchos Melachim 11:1). During the messianic age, all forms of idolatry will be abolished, for all peoples
will unite to serve the One Creator; thus, the reason for the Temple offerings in this age cannot be because of a need to wean people from pagan practices,
“for the earth will be filled with knowledge of the Compassionate One” (Isaiah 11:9).

We therefore need to seek a deeper meaning for the Temple offerings, and in this letter, we shall mention two “clues” which can guide us on our quest: The
first clue can be found in the Hebrew word for offerings, “korban” – a word which is derived from “karov” (closeness). As the classical biblical commentator,
the Ramban (Nachmanides), writes:

“All terms of korban are expressions of closeness and unity.” (Commentary to Leviticus 1:9).

In this spirit, Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch writes:

“We have no word in Western languages that adequately conveys the concept in the Hebrew term korban. The common German translation opher, deriving from
the Latin offero, is related to “offering” in meaning; but unfortunately, in the sense of ‘sacrifice,’ it has taken on the connotation of destruction,
annihilation, and loss – a connotation that is foreign and antithetical to the Hebrew concept of korban…The purpose of a korban is to seek the Divine nearness.”
(Commentary to Leviticus 1:2)

The second clue can be found in the Hebrew term for God which is used when the Torah introduces the laws of the korban. The term used is “Hashem” – the
most sacred Divine Name which expresses the attribute of compassion. As Rabbi Yossi states in Midrash Toras Kohanim (Leviticus 1:2): “Wherever the offerings
are mentioned, the Divine Name of Hashem is used, so as not to give heretics the opportunity to degrade the truths of the Torah to the level of pagan delusion.”
In his explanation of Rabbi Yossi’s teaching, Rabbi Hirsch points out that within the Torah, the Divine Name “Elokim” – the Name expressing the attribute
of strict justice – is not used in association with the korban. Rabbi Hirsch writes:

“In such a context, God does not refer to Himself by the attribute of strict, unrelenting justice…God does not demand to be appeased through an offering,
in accord with the blasphemous pagan delusion. He does not seek vengeance and thirst for blood and accept the dying animal as a substitute for the human
being who deserves to die. Rather, the Name Hashem is associated with offerings; God refers to himself by the attribute of compassion. He appears in the
full force of His liberating love, which brings into being all life, sustains its existence anew, and grants it a renewed future. The essence of an offering
is not killing, but rebirth and renewal of existence. Spiritual and moral awakening and revival; entering into a life more noble and pure; renewing strength
for such a life from the never-failing source of God’s love – that is the Jewish concept of an offering.” (Ibid)

With the help of Hashem, in our upcoming letters, we will begin to explore deep and mystical Torah teachings which can help us to understand how the korban
leads to a greater closeness with Hashem, and how it leads to our rebirth and renewal.

Shalom,
Yosef Ben Shlomo Hakohen (See below)

Related Teachings:

1. The classical biblical commentators give different reasons for the Temple offerings, based on sources within the Written and the Oral Torah. These various
explanations can be understood as different facets of the same truth. As our sages teach: “The Torah has seventy faces” (Zohar, Vol. 1, 47b).
2. The classical biblical commentator, Radak, suggests that Adam and Abel did not actually slaughter the animals that they offered on the Altar, for at
this early stage of human history, human beings did not have permission to kill animals, since their diet was vegetarian. They therefore placed the animals
on the Altar, and a Heavenly fire consumed them. (Commentary to Genesis 4:4)

3. As we shall discuss, the Prophets of Israel state that all the offerings – including the animal offerings – will be renewed when the Temple is rebuilt
in the messianic age. In this spirit, Maimonides wrote that in the messianic age we will once again bring the offerings “according to all the particulars
mentioned in the Torah” (Hilchos Melachim 11:1). Will we ever reach a stage in human history when all the offerings will be vegetarian? Following our future
discussion on the deeper meaning of the korban, we will explore various answers to this question.

Hazon – Our Universal Vision

All of this sounds absolutely gorgeous, and I have to say that Robert Israel Aumann has made me, (and it seems, Jews the world over), proud

By Dr. David Rosen

Respect is earned — ask our newest friends from the Swedish
Royal Family — inheritance helps, but what really counts is
one’s work and effort. When King Carl XVI Gustaf of the
House of Bernadotte took three steps back and bowed to
laureate Yisrael, his genius head crowned with a white
crocheted kippah — There was Respect.
The King’s Guard Trumpeters sounded from the high mezzanine
in front, and fellow trumpeters in the palatial distance
regally answered with notes seconding the honor. Even more
palpable was the thundering applause signifying the honor
this G-d fearing proud Jew engenders.
The Professor, who has recently been unceasingly dogged by
reporters, from all over the world, is constantly teaching
and enlightening by words of wisdom. As water pours from
royal Scandia crystal, our robust bard pours forth Torah.
Prof. Yisrael Aumann’s toast at the Nobel Banquet:
“Baruch Atah Adonai Elohainu Melech HaOlam HaTov v’HaMativ;
Blessed are you, God, our Lord, Monarch of the Universe, who
is good and does good.
After partaking of a meal with excellent wine, we recite
this benediction when we are served with a superb wine.
Your Royal Highness, we have, over the years, partaken of an
excellent wine. We have participated in the scientific
enterprise – studied and taught; preserved, and pushed
forward the boundaries of knowledge.
We have participated in the human enterprise – raised
beautiful families. And I have participated in the
realization of a 2000-year old dream – the return of my
people to Jerusalem, to its homeland.
And tonight, we have been served with a superb wine, in the
recognition of the worth of our enterprise.
I feel very strongly that this recognition is not only for
us, but for all game theory, in Israel and in the whole
world – teachers, students, colleagues, and co-workers. And
especially to one individual, who is no longer with us – the
mother of game theory, Oskar Morgenstern.
So, I offer my thanks to these, to the Nobel Foundation and
the Nobel Committee, to our magnificent hosts, the country
of Sweden, and the Lord, who is good and does good.”
The table settings of brand new gilded heavy silver & fresh
from the kiln china & recently blown gold-stemmed crystal
stood ready for our kosher pleasure.
The kosher sommelier stood behind us eager to direct his
retinue of white gloved and linen toweled wine stewards.
They were uniformed in burgundy red while the divisions of
waiters were clothed in epauletted white.
The Chairman of the Board of the Nobel Foundation toasted
the laureates; the King of Sweden toasted our unseen
benefactor, Alfred Nobel. With the bubbles of the “Skoal”
{L’Chaim} still effervescing in our mouth, the attentive
waiters dramatically revealed the tender salad leaves hidden
in gold & green bordered covered bowls. This was just the
beginning. The Royal Banquet is scripted but secret, it is
the highlight of dark early winter. TV crews and reporters
stood in the pillared shadows; the media buildup in
Scandinavia is monumental.
Conversation, at first hesitant with our unknown table
neighbors (family and colleagues of laureates, integrated
man, woman, man) began to flow with the seemingly limitless
flow of fine kosher wines and very special kosher old pale
liquors.
The very Swedish menu of rare snow-grouse-breast covered in
reindeer meat and forest herbs was NOT served to the 36 of
us. The kosher contingent enjoyed a much less gamy fare of
goose covered in fillet of beef. That tasty texture was
relished along with whole blanched green snow beans and
northern forest champignons in espagnole roux. Differential
change was geared by the partially processed, fried and then
baked, pommes de terre and slightly caramelized pommes de
arbre.
The musical and visual interludes of choral singers bearing
cut forest flowers is apparently in the best tradition of
these long dark Northern nights. Collars and head
decorations of dainty baby’s breath, crocus, lilies, and other
delicate bulb petals feasted the eyes with pale yellows,
pinks and whites as the framboises arctiques artistically
contrasted the sorbet and then tickled the tongue.
The snowy, dark (sunlight merely from 8 to 3) & cool
reception (i.e. cold: -4 C) was more than balanced by the
wish and ability to please and accommodate. The helicopter
overhead, the athletic ear pieced ushers, the polished
stretch Volvo limousine drivers and the diplomatic
ever-accommodating Nobel attendant, Annika Klangstrom, have
all earned their keep! Annika knew the routine from last
year. The efficient and capable Ms. Klangstrom was one of
the first Swedish diplomats on the scene of the tsunami
where so many of her countrymen were lost. Although being a
Nobel attendant is a once-in-a-lifetime plum for a Swedish
diplomat, worthy Annika was awarded this honor two years in
a row.
The doormen, bellmen and housekeeping staff already know
more about the difficulties of electricity use on Shabbat
than most Europeans. The shatnez story, the prohibition of
Jews wearing weaved-together wool & linen, made for big
interest in the Swedish press & media, so much so, I think I
can safely say more Swedes know about shatnez than all the
other Europeans and Africans combined.
Yisrael’s contingent walked on Shabbat. The orthodox
community is in one direction, while the ChaBaD is exactly
opposite. The old synagogue and chader now reinvigorated by
the Lubavitchers is situated on the far side of a bridge
that spans the significant Malaren where it rushes into the
frigid Baltic. Afterwards, Kiddush was partaken in the
relatively close Jewish Community Center, attended by His
Excellency, the Israeli Ambassador (the Swedes know
protocol!) The Jewish community of Stockholm, while always
small, was given a Royal Charter way back in 1790. Today it
honors a Swede, a Righteous of the Nations Hero in a big
way. The JCC is adjacent to the twelve raw bronze sculptures
comprising the Raoul Wallenberg Square…the invisible
shield.”Who is Good and Does Good!”
While we no doubt have earned curiosity (and not a little
bit of envy) for our ideals over the last 4000 years,
in the last 6 days in Stockholm we witnessed the unfurling
of the azure Shield of David on a striped Tallis banner
flying high in the center of Stockholm — opposite the Royal
Palace – flying high and proudly proclaiming a respected
place along side the U.S. Stars & Stripes, the British Union
Jack, the Australian Southern Constellation, the vertical
stripes of France and the horizontal of Germany.
The exemplary life of Our Teacher, Yisrael ben Reb Shlomo –
may his days and years be lengthened – has given new honor
to the whole of Am Yisrael: Respect fit for a King.

Originally published at Customerservant.com. You can comment here or there.

All of this sounds absolutely gorgeous, and I have to say that Robert Israel Aumann has made me, (and it seems, Jews the world over), proud

By Dr. David Rosen

Respect is earned — ask our newest friends from the Swedish
Royal Family — inheritance helps, but what really counts is
one’s work and effort. When King Carl XVI Gustaf of the
House of Bernadotte took three steps back and bowed to
laureate Yisrael, his genius head crowned with a white
crocheted kippah — There was Respect.
The King’s Guard Trumpeters sounded from the high mezzanine
in front, and fellow trumpeters in the palatial distance
regally answered with notes seconding the honor. Even more
palpable was the thundering applause signifying the honor
this G-d fearing proud Jew engenders.
The Professor, who has recently been unceasingly dogged by
reporters, from all over the world, is constantly teaching
and enlightening by words of wisdom. As water pours from
royal Scandia crystal, our robust bard pours forth Torah.
Prof. Yisrael Aumann’s toast at the Nobel Banquet:
“Baruch Atah Adonai Elohainu Melech HaOlam HaTov v’HaMativ;
Blessed are you, God, our Lord, Monarch of the Universe, who
is good and does good.
After partaking of a meal with excellent wine, we recite
this benediction when we are served with a superb wine.
Your Royal Highness, we have, over the years, partaken of an
excellent wine. We have participated in the scientific
enterprise – studied and taught; preserved, and pushed
forward the boundaries of knowledge.
We have participated in the human enterprise – raised
beautiful families. And I have participated in the
realization of a 2000-year old dream – the return of my
people to Jerusalem, to its homeland.
And tonight, we have been served with a superb wine, in the
recognition of the worth of our enterprise.
I feel very strongly that this recognition is not only for
us, but for all game theory, in Israel and in the whole
world – teachers, students, colleagues, and co-workers. And
especially to one individual, who is no longer with us – the
mother of game theory, Oskar Morgenstern.
So, I offer my thanks to these, to the Nobel Foundation and
the Nobel Committee, to our magnificent hosts, the country
of Sweden, and the Lord, who is good and does good.”
The table settings of brand new gilded heavy silver & fresh
from the kiln china & recently blown gold-stemmed crystal
stood ready for our kosher pleasure.
The kosher sommelier stood behind us eager to direct his
retinue of white gloved and linen toweled wine stewards.
They were uniformed in burgundy red while the divisions of
waiters were clothed in epauletted white.
The Chairman of the Board of the Nobel Foundation toasted
the laureates; the King of Sweden toasted our unseen
benefactor, Alfred Nobel. With the bubbles of the “Skoal”
{L’Chaim} still effervescing in our mouth, the attentive
waiters dramatically revealed the tender salad leaves hidden
in gold & green bordered covered bowls. This was just the
beginning. The Royal Banquet is scripted but secret, it is
the highlight of dark early winter. TV crews and reporters
stood in the pillared shadows; the media buildup in
Scandinavia is monumental.
Conversation, at first hesitant with our unknown table
neighbors (family and colleagues of laureates, integrated
man, woman, man) began to flow with the seemingly limitless
flow of fine kosher wines and very special kosher old pale
liquors.
The very Swedish menu of rare snow-grouse-breast covered in
reindeer meat and forest herbs was NOT served to the 36 of
us. The kosher contingent enjoyed a much less gamy fare of
goose covered in fillet of beef. That tasty texture was
relished along with whole blanched green snow beans and
northern forest champignons in espagnole roux. Differential
change was geared by the partially processed, fried and then
baked, pommes de terre and slightly caramelized pommes de
arbre.
The musical and visual interludes of choral singers bearing
cut forest flowers is apparently in the best tradition of
these long dark Northern nights. Collars and head
decorations of dainty baby’s breath, crocus, lilies, and other
delicate bulb petals feasted the eyes with pale yellows,
pinks and whites as the framboises arctiques artistically
contrasted the sorbet and then tickled the tongue.
The snowy, dark (sunlight merely from 8 to 3) & cool
reception (i.e. cold: -4 C) was more than balanced by the
wish and ability to please and accommodate. The helicopter
overhead, the athletic ear pieced ushers, the polished
stretch Volvo limousine drivers and the diplomatic
ever-accommodating Nobel attendant, Annika Klangstrom, have
all earned their keep! Annika knew the routine from last
year. The efficient and capable Ms. Klangstrom was one of
the first Swedish diplomats on the scene of the tsunami
where so many of her countrymen were lost. Although being a
Nobel attendant is a once-in-a-lifetime plum for a Swedish
diplomat, worthy Annika was awarded this honor two years in
a row.
The doormen, bellmen and housekeeping staff already know
more about the difficulties of electricity use on Shabbat
than most Europeans. The shatnez story, the prohibition of
Jews wearing weaved-together wool & linen, made for big
interest in the Swedish press & media, so much so, I think I
can safely say more Swedes know about shatnez than all the
other Europeans and Africans combined.
Yisrael’s contingent walked on Shabbat. The orthodox
community is in one direction, while the ChaBaD is exactly
opposite. The old synagogue and chader now reinvigorated by
the Lubavitchers is situated on the far side of a bridge
that spans the significant Malaren where it rushes into the
frigid Baltic. Afterwards, Kiddush was partaken in the
relatively close Jewish Community Center, attended by His
Excellency, the Israeli Ambassador (the Swedes know
protocol!) The Jewish community of Stockholm, while always
small, was given a Royal Charter way back in 1790. Today it
honors a Swede, a Righteous of the Nations Hero in a big
way. The JCC is adjacent to the twelve raw bronze sculptures
comprising the Raoul Wallenberg Square…the invisible
shield.”Who is Good and Does Good!”
While we no doubt have earned curiosity (and not a little
bit of envy) for our ideals over the last 4000 years,
in the last 6 days in Stockholm we witnessed the unfurling
of the azure Shield of David on a striped Tallis banner
flying high in the center of Stockholm — opposite the Royal
Palace – flying high and proudly proclaiming a respected
place along side the U.S. Stars & Stripes, the British Union
Jack, the Australian Southern Constellation, the vertical
stripes of France and the horizontal of Germany.
The exemplary life of Our Teacher, Yisrael ben Reb Shlomo –
may his days and years be lengthened – has given new honor
to the whole of Am Yisrael: Respect fit for a King.